Click on each funding source to learn further information. After reviewing the information on funding in this section, write in your journal about what new information you found and how you could use it.

Publicly funded:

Head Start is a federally funded program (United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families) for low-income families with children three to five years old. For more information about Head Start, please visit http://www.eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc

Early Head Start is a federally funded program for low-income pregnant women and their families with children zero to three years of age (enrollment must be prior to the child s 30th month of age). Head Start and Early Head Start programs offer high-quality education and early childhood development programs as well as other professional services such as medical, dental and mental health services, nutritional support, family literacy and parental advocacy training. These programs support strong staff professional development and training; and staff is generally paid at a higher level, including benefits not typically found in private or other Non-profit child care programs. For more information about Early Head Start, please visit http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/Early%20Head%20Start

These are preschool programs funded by the California Department of Education (CDE) with contracts administered through local educational agencies, colleges, community-based agencies, and private non-profit agencies. State preschool programs are intended as part-day comprehensive developmental, cultural, linguistically, and nutritionally supportive programs for 3-5 year old low-income families emphasizing parental education, involvement, health and social services. Opportunities for staff development are also encouraged. In addition, state preschool programs are bound by enrollment priorities as set forth in Title 5. For more information about State Preschool, please visit http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/op/

These programs, known as General Child Care Centers, are funded by the California Department of Education for full day child care, and regulated under Title 5 (Link to title 5 here?). General Child Care contracted operators provide child development services intended to support developmental, cultural, linguistically, and nutritionally supportive programs for low-income families with children from birth through 12 years of age and older children with exceptional needs, emphasizing parental education, health and social services. Opportunities for staff development are also encouraged. The State delivers this funding from a blending of state and federal funds with contracts administered through local educational agencies, colleges, community-action agencies, and private non-profit or for-profit agencies. . For more information about General Child Care (CCTR and CSPP), please visit http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/op/

There are two types of child care voucher subsidy programs in California: the Alternative Payment Programs and/or California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs). The combined programs subsidize child care for about 250,000 children statewide.

First 5 Commission: Proposition 10, the ballot initiative (cigarette tax) that was approved by voters in 1998 established the California Children and Families State Commission (now referred to as First 5 California), and authorized the establishment of county First 5 Commissions. County First 5 Commissions throughout the state are designed to provide, on a community-by-community basis, all children prenatal to five years of age with a comprehensive, integrated system of early childhood development services. County Commission funding is based upon live birth rates in each county. For more information, please visit:

First 5 Commission - http://www.ccfc.ca.gov/

First 5 LA - http://www.first5la.org/

Los Angeles Universal Preschool is an independent public benefit corporation, created in 2004 and funded by First 5 LA - the commission established by Proposition 10. LAUP's goal is to make voluntary, high-quality preschool available to every 4-year-old in Los Angeles County, regardless of their family's income by 2016.

Launched in March 2005, LAUP funds preschools for nearly 9,000 4-year-olds and when LAUP has reached full scale, funded classrooms will serve more than 100,000 4-year-olds

Improving Existing Preschools

LAUP is providing new resources to existing preschools to help enhance the quality of their programs. In addition to funding these programs, LAUP also provides quality coaching and mentoring by experienced childhood educators.

Increasing Access to Preschool

By providing operating funds for classrooms that previously stood empty and helping fund the creation of brand new classrooms, LAUP has made high-quality preschool available to thousands more children.

Providing Parent Choice

Parents deserve a choice about where to send their child to preschool. That is why LAUP works with private, public, and charter schools, and it is why LAUP is one of the first universal preschool programs in the nation to include home-based Family Child Care preschools in its network.

Addressing Special Needs

"Universal" means working to make preschool accessible to all children, including children with special needs or disabilities. LAUP partners with a number of preschools to develop model practices to include children with special needs and disabilities in the classroom.

For more information about LAUP, please visit http://www.laup.net

Sponsored under the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Child and Adult Care Food Programs is a federal and state program that funds monthly cash reimbursements to child care center operators and family child care home providers for meals served to children in their care that meet Federal nutritional guidelines. USDA s Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) play a vital role in improving the quality of child care and making it more affordable for many low-income families. For more information about Child Care and Adult Care Food Program, please visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/care/default.htm In California, the child care food program is administered by the California Department of Education through intermediaries contracted with the State to assume administrative and financial responsibility for the food program operations. For more information, please visit http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/nu/cc/ccc.asp

There are various public sources for core child care services and/or other enhancements funded through vouchers or contracts. These include funding for: special needs children, homeless children and families, mental or primary health consultations, social services, community development block grants, and staff compensation or development.

Privately funded:

In this child care situation the family pays the tuition/fees directly to the operator for care of the child/ren. It is the only situation wherein the family pays the full cost of child care for their child/ren. However, the operator may also serve children who are subsidized by other funding sources.

Fees are set by the operator generally taking into account the location of the facility (high income vs. low income area, region, county, etc.), the market rate (what persons in that area can afford to pay and the going-rate for similar facilities in the area), the age of children in care (infant care being the most costly), the child s needs (care for children with special needs is more costly), and the quality of care (high quality child care costs are higher as more staff is employed, staff is generally better educated and trained, etc.).

In order to subsidize the cost of doing business (i.e. tuition expenses, operational costs such as equipment purchasing and maintenance, subsidy shortfalls, etc.), it is a common practice for childcare center operators to engage in fundraising activities. Activities such as bake sales, garage sales, sponsored events, private donor solicitation, direct corporate solicitation, and grant writing to foundations are common practices the savvy child care operator uses. In addition, fundraising activities are common to complete on time or periodic capital projects. For example, operators have on occasion solicited donations from local community businesses.

There are various private sources for core child care services and/or other enhancements funded through grants. These include funding for: special needs children, homeless children and families, mental or primary health consultations, social services, community development block grants, and staff compensation or development.

Corporate funded:

Corporations may have benefit plans where employees may either contribute to a pre-tax savings plan where the money is paid directly to child care providers or centers or employees may be able to choose among company paid benefits that includes child care fees.

Corporations may have an onsite or offsite child care facility either run by the company or contracted out to an individual or agency exclusively for the use by their employees.

After reviewing the information on funding in this section; write in your journal about what new information you found and how you could use it.

You can continue to add on to your journal from other professions after you save your entry. Make sure you print your journal before leaving the website.

Vicki Vazquez

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